MiR 040 Shorts – Dove or Dived


You should go to the website, http:www.markinrussia.com and look at the show notes and vocabulary. You’ll get more out of the lesson if you are able to follow it in writing.

Todays Quick Grammar Tip concerns the use Dived and Dove. Which is correct and when do we use it.

 

Dived is the standard past-tense and past-participle form of the verb dive. This has always been the case throughout the history of modern English. The use of dove as a form of dive comes from a false analogy with drove and drive.  But, sometimes the rules change due to common usage as in this case. North American English (US and Canada) use “Dove” as the past tense of “dive” about 75% of the time, so in other words, although “dived” is the correct past tense, dove is also acceptable. However, when writing for non-North American audiences, I would recommend “Dived” and not “dove”. You can always play is safe and use “dived” in every situation and you’ll never be wrong.

Examples

British and Australian writers use the traditional dived:

Bob dived into the water to save the little boy.

Bob had dived into the same lake every summer as he was growing up.

US and Canada

Bob dove into the water to save the little boy.

Bob had dove into the same lake every summer as he was growing up.

Unlike the incorrect “Drive/Drove” analogy, we do not say that “Bob had doven into the same lake every summer as he was growing up”.

Another example;

Br.  During the world economic crisis, our sales dived 35%.

Am. During the world economic crisis, our sales dove 35%.

In America, although the word “dove” would be most common, either of the above sentences would sound OK.

Thanks for listening through to the end of this week’s podcast, listen again next week for another Mark in Russia Quick Grammar tip. Until then, Good Bye!

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